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The Telegraph :: New London, Connecticut

"Thanks to subtle inventiveness and diligent reflection, the organ has reached such a state of perfection that it lacks nothing; it needs no further experimentation or development at all," wrote the famous German composer and music theorist Michael Praetorius in 1619. Many composers, from the North Sea to the Baltic, celebrated the great richness of this instrument: his homonym Hieronymus Praetorius, Dietrich Buxtehude, but also Tunder, Weckmann, Leyding, Druckenmüller, Hanff and Bruhns, helped to build up a dedicated repertoire, thus giving rise, between the 16th and 18th centuries, to a true North German organ tradition. This program was recorded in Dübendorf, Switzerland, on an organ built by Bernhardt Edskes. Dirk Trüten pays a vibrant tribute here to a heritage that was to inspire J.S. Bach, amongst others, and which reveals the beauty of this fascinating instrument.
"Thanks to subtle inventiveness and diligent reflection, the organ has reached such a state of perfection that it lacks nothing; it needs no further experimentation or development at all," wrote the famous German composer and music theorist Michael Praetorius in 1619. Many composers, from the North Sea to the Baltic, celebrated the great richness of this instrument: his homonym Hieronymus Praetorius, Dietrich Buxtehude, but also Tunder, Weckmann, Leyding, Druckenmüller, Hanff and Bruhns, helped to build up a dedicated repertoire, thus giving rise, between the 16th and 18th centuries, to a true North German organ tradition. This program was recorded in Dübendorf, Switzerland, on an organ built by Bernhardt Edskes. Dirk Trüten pays a vibrant tribute here to a heritage that was to inspire J.S. Bach, amongst others, and which reveals the beauty of this fascinating instrument.
5051083183505
Splendour & Fantasy: North German Organ Tradition
Artist: Dirk Truten
Format: CD
New: Available $21.98
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Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Hieronymus: Magnificat Primi Toni Versus 1
2. In Tenore
3. Hieronymus: Magnificat Primi Toni Versus 2
4. In Discanto
5. Hieronymus: Magnificat Primi Toni Versus 3
6. In Basso
7. Matthias: Fantasia in D
8. Matthias: Ach Wir Armen Sünder Primus Versus
9. Choral in Ten
10. Matthias: Ach Wir Armen Sünder Secundus Versus
11. A 2 Clav. E Ped
12. Matthias: Ach Wir Armen Sünder Tertius Versus
13. A 2 Clav
14. Matthias: Canzon in C
15. Franz: Komm, Heiliger Geist, Herre Gott
16. Auff 2 Clavier [Pedaliter]
17. Dietrich: Praeludium in a, Buxwv 153
18. Dietrich: Von Gott Will Ich Nicht Lassen, Buxwv 220
19. Dietrich: Von Gott Will Ich Nicht Lassen, Buxwv 221
20. Dietrich: Von Gott Will Ich Nicht Lassen Versus 1
21. [A 3]
22. Dietrich: Von Gott Will Ich Nicht Lassen Versus 2
23. [A 2]
24. Dietrich: Von Gott Will Ich Nicht Lassen Versus 3
25. [A 2]
26. Dietrich: Von Gott Will Ich Nicht Lassen Versus 4
27. [A 4 Pedaliter]
28. Dietrich: Von Gott Will Ich Nicht Lassen Versus 5
29. [A 4 Pedaliter]
30. Dietrich: Von Gott Will Ich Nicht Lassen Versus 6
31. [A 5 Con Pedale Doppio]
32. Wolfgang: Concerto in G I. Allegro
33. Wolfgang: Concerto in G II. Adagio
34. Wolfgang: Concerto in G III. Allegro
35. Nikolaus: Von Gott Will Ich Nicht Lassen
36. Nikolaus: Praeludium in G

More Info:

"Thanks to subtle inventiveness and diligent reflection, the organ has reached such a state of perfection that it lacks nothing; it needs no further experimentation or development at all," wrote the famous German composer and music theorist Michael Praetorius in 1619. Many composers, from the North Sea to the Baltic, celebrated the great richness of this instrument: his homonym Hieronymus Praetorius, Dietrich Buxtehude, but also Tunder, Weckmann, Leyding, Druckenmüller, Hanff and Bruhns, helped to build up a dedicated repertoire, thus giving rise, between the 16th and 18th centuries, to a true North German organ tradition. This program was recorded in Dübendorf, Switzerland, on an organ built by Bernhardt Edskes. Dirk Trüten pays a vibrant tribute here to a heritage that was to inspire J.S. Bach, amongst others, and which reveals the beauty of this fascinating instrument.
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